Ask your food processor to knead for 1 minute Essay

Ask your food processor to knead for 1 minute



With yeast breads, it’s the mixing and kneading that take most
of your effort. But when a food processor does the work, these steps
get done quickly and easily.



The procedure is elementary: measure dry ingredients into the work
bowl. With the motor running, slowly pour in dissolved yeast and any
other liquid ingredients. In less than a minute, the dough is mixed,
kneaded, and ready to let rise.



The average food processor bowl holds 4 cups of dry
ingredients–enough to make one loaf. We designed these five recipes in
one-loaf proportions; in the sourdough recipe, you split the dough to
make two small baguettes. To make more than one loaf, we found it
easiest to make two consecutive batches, even if you have a larger work
bowl.



Unless you have a special plastic blade just for yeast doughs, use
the metal blade. It’s important not to process the dough more than
60 seconds. Any longer and the dough overheats (and may work up under
the blade and onto the drive shaft, making quite a mess). Also, you can
overtax the motor; if the machine begins to slow down, stop it and check
the dough. If dough is too wet or sticky, add a tablespoon of flour at
a time, turning the machine on and off in short bursts.



Turkey-stuffing Bread



1 package active dry yeast



1 teaspoon sugar



3/4 cup warm water (about 110|)



2 tablespoons salad oil


About 2 3/4 cups all-purpose flour



1/2 cup cornmeal


2 tablespoons toasted instant minced onion



1 teaspoon each celery seed and salt



3/4 teaspoon each rubbed sage and dry rosemary



1/4 teaspoon pepper



1 egg



Mix yeast and sugar with water; let stand until foamy, about 10
minutes. Stir in oil.



In a food processor fitted with a plastic dough blade or metal
blade, combine 2 1/2 cups of the flour, the cornmeal, onion, celery
seed, salt, sage, rosemary, and pepper; process just to blend. Add the
egg. With machine running, pour in yeast mixture in a slow, steady
stream.



Run machine for 45 seconds to knead dough. It should be slightly
sticky; if too wet, add some of the remaining flour, 1 tablespoon at a
time.



Remove dough and shape into a ball. Turn ball over in a greased
bowl, cover with plastic wrap, and let rise in a warm place until
doubled, about 1 1/2 hours.



Punch down dough and knead briefly on a floured board to shape into
a smooth loaf. Place in a greased 4 1/2- by 8 1/2-inch loaf pan. Cover
lightly with plastic wrap; let stand until loaf has risen about 1 1/4
inches above pan rim, about 45 minutes. Discard plastic.



Bake in a 375| oven until well browned, about 35 minutes. Turn out
of pan onto a rack to cool. Makes 1 loaf, about 1 3/4 pounds. Slice for
sandwiches or make into croutons to stuff a bird; toasting brings out
the herb flavor.



Polenta Cheese Bread



1 package active dry yeast



2 tablespoons sugar



1 cup warm water (about 110|)



4 ounces sharp Cheddar cheese, cut into small chunks



About 3 1/2 cups all-purpose flour



1/2 cup polenta (coarse ltalian cornmeal) or yellow cornmeal



1 teaspoon salt



1 egg



Mix yeast and 1 teaspoon of the sugar with water; let stand until
foamy, about 10 minutes.



In a food processor fitted with a plastic dough blade or metal
blade, combine the cheese, 3 1/4 cups of the flour, remaining sugar,
polenta, and salt; process until cheese is finely chopped. Add the egg.
With motor running, pour in yeast mixture in a slow, steady stream.



Run machine 45 seconds to knead dough. Dough should be slightly
sticky; if too wet, add some of remaining flour, 1 tablespoon at a time.



Shape dough into a smooth ball. Turn ball over in a greased bowl;
cover with plastic wrap and let rise in a warm place until doubled,
about 1 to 1 1/2 hours.


Punch down dough and knead briefly on a floured board to shape into
a smooth ball. Place on a greased 11- by 14-inch baking sheet and
flatten into a 7-inch-diameter round. Cover lightly with plastic wrap
and let rise until loaf is about 2 1/2 inches high, about 1 hour;
discard plastic.



Sprinkle top with about 1 tablespoon all-purpose flour. Bake in a
375| oven until well browned, about 35 minutes. Let cool on a rack.
Makes 1 loaf, about 2 pounds.



Dark Rye Bread



1 package active dry yeast



1 teaspoon sugar



1 cup warm water (about 110|)



3 tablespoons dark molasses



2 tablespoons salad oil



1/2 ounce unsweetened baking chocolate



3/4 cup shredded bran cereal



1 tablespoon caraway seed



1/2 teaspoon fennel seed



1 teaspoon salt



1 1/2 cups rye flour



About 1 3/4 cups all-purpose flour



Mix yeast and sugar with warm water; let stand until foamy, about
10 minutes. Stir in the molasses and oil; set aside.



In a food processor fitted with a plastic dough blade or metal
blade, combine chocolate, bran, caraway seed, fennel seed, and salt;
process until chocolate is finely chopped. Add the rye flour and 1 1/2
cups of the all-purpose flour. With motor running, pour in yeast
mixture in a slow, steady stream.



Run machine 45 seconds to knead dough. Dough should be slightly
sticky; if too wet, add some of remaining all-purpose flour, 1
tablespoon at a time.



Remove dough and knead briefly with floured hands; shape into a
smooth ball. Turn ball over in a greased bowl. Cover with plastic wrap
and let rise in a warm place until doubled, about 1 1/2 hours.



Punch down dough and knead briefly on a floured board to shape into
a smooth ball. Place on a greased 11- by 14-inch baking sheet. Flatten
ball slightly to make a 6-inch-diameter round.



Cover with plastic wrap and let rise until loaf is about 2 1/2
inches high, about 45 minutes. Bake in a 375| oven until well browned,
about 35 minutes. Let cool on a rack. Makes 1 loaf, about 1 1/2
pounds.



Whole-wheat Country Loaf



1 package active dry yeast



1 teaspoon sugar



1 cup warm water (about 110|)



2 tablespoons molasses



1 tablespoon salad oil



1 3/4 cups whole-wheat flour



About 1 1/4 cups all-purpose flour



1/4 cup wheat germ


1 teaspoon salt



1 egg white beaten with 2 teaspoons water



Mix yeast and sugar with water; let stand until foamy, about 10
minutes. Stir in molasses and oil.



In a food processor fitted with a plastic dough blade or metal
blade, process the whole-wheat flour, 1 cup of all-purpose flour, the
wheat germ, and salt just to blend. With motor running, pour in yeast
mixture in a slow, steady stream.



Run machine 45 seconds to knead dough. Dough should be slightly
sticky; if too wet, add some of remaining all-purpose flour, 1
tablespoon at a time.



Shape dough into a ball; turn over in a greased bowl. Cover with
plastic wrap and let rise in a warm place until doubled, about 1 1/2
hours. Punch down dough and knead briefly on a floured board to shape
into a smooth 10-inch-long oblong. Cover lightly with plastic wrap and
let rise until almost doubled, about 45 minutes; discard plastic.



With a razor blade or sharp knife, cut three 1/2-inch-deep
lengthwise slashes on top of loaf. Brush lightly with egg mixture. Bake
in a 375| oven until well browned, about 35 minutes. Let cool on a
rack. Makes 1 loaf, about 1 1/2 pounds.



Sourdough Baguettes



1 package active dry yeast



1 teaspoon sugar



3/4 cup warm water (about 110|)



3/4 cup sourdough starter, at room temperature



About 3 1/4 cups all-purpose flour



1 teaspoon salt



Cornmeal



1 teaspoon cornstarch


1/2 cup water



Boiling water



Mix yeast and sugar with warm water; let stand until foamy, about
10 minutes.



In a food processor fitted with a plastic dough blade or metal
blade, combine yeast mixture, starter, and 2 cups of the flour; process
to blend. Let stand at room temperature, with bowl lid on, until
mixture doubles in size, about 1 1/2 hours. Add salt and 1 cup of the
remaining flour; process to blend well.



Run machine 45 to 60 seconds to knead dough. Gradually add some of
remaining flour, 1 to 2 tablespoons at a time, until dough is just
slightly sticky to touch.



Remove dough and knead briefly on a floured board to shape into a
smooth ball. Divide in half. Shape each half into a smooth log about
12 inches long. Set loaves on a piece of stiff cardboard generously
sprinkled with cornmeal. Cover lightly with plastic wrap and let rise
until puffy and almost doubled, about 45 minutes; discard plastic.



Adjust oven racks so they are at the two lowest positions. Place
an ungreased 14- by 17-inch baking sheet on top rack and a rimmed 10- by
15-inch pan on bottom rack, then preheat oven to 400|.



Meanwhile, bring cornstarch and 1/2 cup water to boiling, stirring;
let cool slightly. With a razor blade or sharp knife, cut four
1/2-inch-deep diagonal slashes on top of each loaf. Evenly brush
cornstarch mixture over each loaf. Pour about 1/4 inch of boiling water
into the rimmed pan in the oven. Carefully slip both loaves off
cardboard, keeping slashed sides up, onto the top baking sheet in oven.



Bake in a 400| oven; after 10 minutes, brush loaves again with
cornstarch mixture. Bake until golden, about 20 minutes longer. Cool on
racks. Makes 2 baguettes, about 3/4 pound each.



Photo: With motor running, slowly pour yeast mixture and any other
liquid ingredients into mixed dry ingredients



Photo: Stop machine when dough forms a ball. Dough should be
slightly sticky; if not, add a little more flour



Photo: Five food processor loaves kneaded in less than a minute:
clockwise from top left, dark rye, polenta cheese, whole wheat,
turkey-stuffing loaf, and sourdough baguettes



Photo: After dough has risen once, knead to expel air; shape into
loaf, then let rise again